Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

MANAGING ANXIETY AMONG BREAST CANCER PATIENTS: THE MODERATING EFFECT OF RELIGIOUS ORIENTATION

Author

Baqutayan Shadiya

Institution

University Technology Malaysia

Abstract

Objectives: This paper discusses about anxiety among breast cancer patients in Malaysia, and how religious orientation puffer their pain and feeling toward their cancer. The purpose is to understand breast cancer related problems, and suggest suitable solutions to reduce the anxiety and depression associated with it.

Methods: Sampling of 100-breast cancer patients assigned from different institutions and hospitals in Malaysia. Hence, their level of anxiety, depression and religious orientation are measured.

Results: The aim of this measurement is to prove that there are significant mean differences between patients at different level in their depression as well as their religious coping strategies. Eventually, it is suggested that the last stage of cancers to be full with anxiety, depression and more religious coping strategies than other stages of breast cancer.

Conclusion: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Anxiety is always associated with it, once women discover that they suffer from breast cancer, they feel that they are toward the grave. Many cases were psychologically managed, but others were not. Some even were worst, their feeling were very difficult to be managed. For that reason, many studies show that, patients turn to religion as coping mechanisms and ways to cope with their depression, because they believe that religious orientation is the best coping strategies to deal with anxiety associated with breast cancer.