Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

VALIDATION OF THE FRAMINGHAM GENERAL CARDIOVASCULAR RISK PREDICTION SCORE IN A MULTI-ETHNIC PRIMARY CARE COHORT

Author

Chia YC 1 , Jenkins C 2 , Tang SYW 3

Institution

1. University of Malaya
2. Wycliffe Road, Cambridge UK, Addenbrookes' Hospital, Cambridge, UK

Abstract

Objectives: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction charts have been developed in western countries. Validation of these charts have found them to either over or under-estimate overall risk depending on the country in which the studies were done. The validity of these score charts for the Asia Pacific region is not known. The aim of this study is to examine the validity of the Framingham general CVD risk chart in a primary care setting.

Methods: This is a 10 year retrospective study of randomly selected patients attending a primary care clinic. Baseline demographic data, history of diabetes and smoking, blood pressure (BP) serum lipids were captured from patient records in 1998. Each patient’s CVD score was computed from these parameters. All CVD events occurring from 1998-2007 were counted.

Results: 1136 patient records were studied. In 1998, mean age was 56.1years (SD±9) 34.7% were men, 8.2% smokers, 56.2% diabetics and 57.6% on anti-hypertensive treatment. Mean BP, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol was 140.3/85.2 mmHg, 5.95, 1.23, 4.09 µmol/L respectively. The mean CVD points for men was 17.8 giving a CVD Risk of 29.4% and for women 16.3, CVD risk of 16.8% respectively. CVD events occurred in 97 (24.6%) men and in 103 (13.9%) women over the 10 years.

Conclusion: Taking into account that this cohort of patients are already on treatment, the Framingham General CVD Risk Prediction Score predicts very accurately the 10-year CVD Risk. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding. In the absence of local risk prediction charts, the Framingham chart is a reliable alternative.