Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

DISEASE PATTERNS AND LIFESTYLE FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH STRESS AMONG POLICE OFFICERS IN KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA

Author

Retneswari M, Awang Bulgiba, David Koh, Karuthan C, Darus A, Ansem ST, Marzuki I, Shathanapriya K

Institution

University of Malaya

Abstract

Objectives: Police stress is a known problem and chronic diseases do not exempt police. To study the associated between disease patterns and lifestyle with stress in police officers in the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study undertaken in 2011. Two district police headquarters and all police stations under them were chosen by cluster sampling in Kuala Lumpur. Five hundred and seventy nine subjects participated in the study. The stress component of the validated Malay version of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress questionnaire was used as the research instrument. Univariate, Multivariate and stepwise regression analysis was done.

Results: The prevalence of stress levels reported among police officers was 17.1% mild, 13.3% moderate and 5.9% severe to very severe stress. Mental disorders, diabetes mellitus and headache were significantly associated with stress levels. Exercising and praying were also found to be significantly associated with stress levels. A person with mental disorder was more likely to be severely stressed compared to a normal person. A person who prayed and exercised was less likely to be severely stress compared to a normal person.

Conclusion: Stress management programme for police officers should incorporate screening for chronic diseases associated with stress while prayers and exercises should be encouraged.