Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

UNINTENDED PREGNANCIES AND CONTRACEPTIVE PRACTICES AMONG MARRIED WOMEN WORKING IN A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY IN MALAYSIA

Author

Najafi F Hejar, A R Hanafiah, M Ahmad Z

Institution

Universiti Putra Malaysia

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of unintended pregnancies and contraceptive method choices. It also aimed factors related to contraceptive practices among women.

Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out using stratified random sampling method from 15 faculties among women working in University Putra Malaysia. Data was collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire.

Results: A total of 294 respondents participated in this study with a response rate of 87.2%. Less than half of the respondents reported the use of contraceptive within the last one month. The most frequently used contraceptive was the oral contraceptive pill (41%) followed by natural method (17%) and intra uterine devices (14%). Mistimed and unwanted pregnancies were reported by 35.0%, and 14.0 % of respondents respectively. The women who experience mistimed pregnancy (p<0.001), unwanted pregnancy (p< 0.001) and abortion (p<0.01) were more likely to use contraceptive methods. Contraceptive users compare to non-users were older (p<0.001), had higher income (p<0.001), and more children (p=0.004).

Conclusion: Over all the use of effective contraceptive methods was low and half of reproductive women were at risk of unintended pregnancy and negative health outcomes. Further study needs to be conducted on women’s contraceptive knowledge, and identify their beliefs and attitude.