Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

THE CONNECTION BETWEEN SKIN AND MIND: FACTORS OF DEPRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIASIS

Author

Rozaidah Jaafar

Institution

Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

Abstract

Objectives: Depression in psoriasis is not well researched as the latter is deemed non-life threatening. This study aimed to determine the rate of depression and its risk factors among patients with psoriasis.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 174 patients with psoriasis at the Dermatology outpatient in Klang. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used to diagnose depression. Other measures included Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale 42 (DASS-42), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and Coping Inventory in Stressful Situations (CISS) besides the patients’ sociodemographic and clinical data.

Results: Over a third (37.4%) of the subjects had major depressive disorder. Bivariate analysis showed that female(p=0.003) and younger(p=0.031) patients, with higher stress level(p < 0.001), lower self-esteem(p < 0.001) and used emotional-coping (p < 0.001) were more likely to have depression. Higher stress level (OR=1.16, CI=1.09-1.23) and lower self-esteem (OR=0.89, CI=0.81-0.97) remained significant with regression analysis (R2=0.43). Interestingly, duration of psoriasis, its severity and presence of skin lesions over the exposed body areas did not have significant association.

Conclusion: One in three patients with psoriasis had depression. Psychological factors rather than the clinical characteristics of psoriasis significantly predicted depression. These findings indicate stress management and self-esteem has potential to combat depression in vulnerable patients.