Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

BPA EXPOSURE DURING PUBERTY INTERRUPTS NON-SOCIAL BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG ADULT BALB/C MICE

Author

Shantakumari Rajan 1,2 , Ammu Radhakrishnan 2 , Abu Bakar Abdul Majeed 3 , Nagaraja Haleagrahara 4 , Karuthan Chinna 5

Institution

1. Faculty of Health Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Bandar Puncak Alam, Malaysia
2. Faculty of Medicine and Health, International Medical University, Bukit Jalil, Malaysia
3. Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Bandar Puncak Alam, Malaysia
4. Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
5. Julius Centre, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Abstract

Introduction: BPA is an endocrine disrupting chemical known to have adverse health effects to humans. Primarily, although most agree that BPA poses a health risk, the conclusions regarding the relevance of “low-dose effects” of BPA on human health differ.

Objectives: Hence the objectives of this study were to determine behavioral changes of mice exposed to BPA from post-weaning until sexual maturity Methods: We studied the effects of pubertal exposure of BPA administered orally (100 µg/kg BW) on non-social behavior in mice.

Results: In the EPM, the number of open arm entries, the time spent in open arms and the total distance travelled were reduced in males but increased in BPA exposed females. Similarly in the holeboard test, the number of head dips were reduced in males but increased in females, thus reversing sex differences in this behavior. In the open field test, BPA exposed mice spent more time in the central quadrants as compared to controls.

Conclusion: These results suggest that various aspects of non-social behavior are affected by low levels of BPA administered between puberty and adulthood. Although a clear masculinization of females or feminization of males was not evident, alterations in exploration, anxiety, and locomotion were observed