Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

GUIDELINES FOR REPORTING PRIMARY RESEARCH: WHAT ARE THEY AND WHY ARE THEY IMPORTANT IN EVIDENCE- BASED MEDICINE?

Author

JNW Lim, M Dahlui

Institution

1 Centre for Population Health (CePH), Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

Abstract

Study results published in biomedical literature guide treatment decisions and shape public policy. The consequence of poorly reported findings is the potential to cause real harm. Inadequate reporting of primary research also restricts the generalize ability and the credibility of studies’ results. To improve the quality of published research reports, reporting guidelines have been developed for over the last two decades and this covers a diverse type of studies. These include CONSORT, QIR/SQUIRE, QUOROM/PRISMA, MOOSE, TREND, STROBE, COREQ, CHERRIES, STARD/QUADAS, GNOSIS, ORION, and STEGA.

Reporting guidelines aim to facilitate publication of a full and accurate description of research as essential details are required to enable the reproduction of study, assessment of bias and relevance of primary study. Reporting guidelines are used to improve clarity and consistency of research reports. They are tools that could help authors, reviewers and editors to provide comprehensive research reports and readers of scientific literature deserve to know that editors, reviewers, and authors have adopted processes that foster clarity and replication.

The evidence of the need for reporting guidelines continues, despite the fact that many journals and editorial groups have publicly endorsed such guidelines. But, gaps still exist in their use; some guidelines are widely used while others have yet been generally applied.

In this presentation, the development, roles, rationale, evidence of need, application and adoption of general reporting guidelines will be discussed, along with challenges for adoption in the Asia Pacific region.