Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

WORKSITE BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT AMONG EMPLOYEE IN KUALA LANGAT DISTRICT, PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

Author

Siti Harirotul Hamrok Asis 1,2 , Nabilla Al-Sadat 1,2

Institution

1. Centre for Population Health, University of Malaya
2. Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Malaysia.

Abstract

Objectives: The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at six month was declined in Malaysia. Studies found working was incompatible with breastfeeding practice, particularly exclusive breastfeeding. With the increasing numbers of mothers in the employment sector in Malaysia, it might contribute to the reduction .The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with breastfeeding duration and the provision of worksite breastfeeding support to working mothers.

Methods: A cross sectional study involving of 964 mothers with six month old baby was carried out from 1st February to 31st December, 2010. Face to face interview with a validated pretested structured questionnaires was conducted assessing sociodemographic factors, maternal characteristics, infant characteristics, employment characteristics, worksite breastfeeding education, breastfeeding policy, facilities available in workplace and breastfeeding practice at 6 month. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to determine factors affecting the breastfeeding practice at 6 month.

Results: The prevalence of breastfeeding at 6 month was 67.5 % to 56.1% (OR:1.66, 95%CI: 1.21- 2.28) among non-working mothers and working respectively. Positive association of breastfeeding at 6 months were Malay mothers, working in government sector, period of working more than 5 years, working half days and available facilities to express and store breast milk at workplace .

Conclusion: Provision of supportive working environment can aid in improving breastfeeding practice among working mothers.