Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

TESTING THE TRANSTHEORETICAL MODEL IN PREDICTING SMOKING RELAPSE AMONG ADULT SMOKERS RECEIVING ASSISTANCE IN QUITTING

Author

Siti Munira Yasin 1,2 , Masilamani Retneswari 2 , Foong-Ming Moy 3 , David Koh 4

Institution

1 Population Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Technology MARA, Sungai Buloh, Selangor, Malaysia
2 Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, University Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
3 Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4 Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Republic of Singapore

Abstract

Objectives: The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) has been used by researchers in the area of smoking cessation. However, the role of TTM in predicting relapse is limited. We aimed to assess whether this model can be utilised to predict relapse, specifically during the action stage.

Methods: The participants included 120 smokers who had abstained from smoking for at least 24 hours following a workplace smoking cessation programme. The participants received cognitive behavioural therapy and nicotine replacement therapy as treatment. We examined predictors of relapse present at the beginning of the programme (time 0) in relation to relapse at 3 months (time 1) and 6 months (time 2) as well as predictors present at time 1 in relation to relapse at time 2.

Results: No significant predictors were observed with regards to TTM measures during either the first 3 months or the first 6 months of follow-up. However, as smokers progressed from Time 1 to Time 2, the smokers who relapsed perceived significantly greater advantages related to smoking and increasingly doubt in ability to quit. In contrast, former smokers with greater self- liberation and determination to abstain were less likely to relapse.

Conclusion: The findings suggest that TTM can be used to predict relapse among quitting smokers. An additional stage boundary within the action stage may exist, within the first six months of quitting among smokers receiving behavioural and pharmacotherapy; this stage boundary should be further explored.