Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

INTENTION TO QUIT AMONG SMOKERS WITH CHRONIC MEDICAL ILLNESS IN A PRIMARY CARE SETTING

Author

Robson N, Jaapar Hajjariah

Institution

University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur

Abstract

Objectives: Smoking is a major public health issue especially among chronic illness patients in Malaysia. This study aimed to assess the intention to quit smoking among smokers with chronic medical illness who attended the Primary Care Clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC).

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 175 smokers attending a primary care clinic for chronic medical illnesses. The survey data was collected using a structured questionnaire incorporating demographics and medical history, assessment of nicotine dependence using the Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence and the Prochaska stages of change questions as the instrument to measure the intention to quit

smoking. Results: The participants were mostly males (90%), Malays (48%), mean age 45 years old, educated up to secondary school (54%) and married. Majority (63%) had moderate nicotine dependence, but 15% had high nicotine dependence. More than a third (36%) had hypertension, 24% had diabetes mellitus, 23% had hypercholesterolaemia, 6% had ischaemic heart disease, 6% were asthmatic, 1% had stroke and 4% had other illnesses. Majority (71.4%) of the smokers were intending to quit smoking in the next 6 months whilst 57.1% had the intention to quit smoking in the next one month.

Conclusion: The benefits of smoking cessation in patients with chronic medical illnesses are unquestionable. All health practitioners should take the opportunity to promote smoking cessation to smokers during a clinic visit encounter.