Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

REDUCING RISK FACTORS FOR METABOLIC SYNDROME AMONG MALAYSIAN ADULTS: DOES KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATES INTO ACTION?

Author

Nor Azwany Yaacob, Wan Mohamad Wan Bebakar, Kamarul Imran Musa, Ab. Aziz al-Safi Ismail, Amir Sharifuddin Md Khir, Ikram Shah Ismail, Khalid Abdul Kadir, Nor Azmi Kamaruddin, Norlaila Mustafa, Osman Ali, Siti Harnida Md Isa, Wan Nazaimoon Wan Mohamud

Institution

Universiti Sains Malaysia

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the knowledge level, attitude direction and practice of Malaysian adults towards prevention of metabolic syndrome related diseases.

Methods: This is a nationwide cross-sectional study using interview validated knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire.

Results: A total of 4340 subjects were interviewed. There were more female and majority were Malays. Only 327(7.5%) had ever heard of metabolic syndrome (MetS). There was no significant difference in knowledge of MetS between rural and urban population. Knowledge on prevention and control of heart disease and diabetes among all responders were generally good. However, knowledge on obesity-related prevention was relatively low. Majority of those in pre-obese and obese class 1 perceived their body weight as suitable for them. Although attitude on the preventive behavior was generally good, majority was either unsure (21.9%) or agree (40.5%) that they had difficulty to increase their physical activity. 20.5% were unsure or agree (38.5%) to have difficulty to change their dietary habits Majority reported to be sedentary, or only performed mild physical activity at work, but were sedentary during leisure time. Subjects who were adviced to change their lifestyle due to medical reasons were able to change only their eating habit but not physical activity or reduce their weight.

Conclusion: Despite having fairly adequate knowledge on some of the risk factors associated with MetS, many Malaysians have yet to translate into behavior and lifestyle changes.