Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG YOUNG ADULTS OF MALAYSIA: AN ONLINE EXPLORATORY SURVEY

Author

Chandrashekhar T Sreeramareddy, Nizar Abdul Majeed Kutty, Mohammed Abdul Razzaq, Jabbar, Boo Nem Yun

Institution

Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University Tunku Abdul Rahman

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the level of physical activity and identify the associated factors

Methods: An online survey was carried out during October, 2011 in University Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR) by opinion poll research committee. Young adults answered Short International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and questionnaire about factors according to socio-ecological model which was adapted from published studies. MET- hours and MET-minutes were calculated and < 840 MET-minutes was considered as insufficient PA

Results: Of 474 participants who completed the survey 253 (53.4%) were females while 221 (46.6%) were males and mean age was 22.4 years (SD=4.7). Mean and median of MET-hours of PA done during previous seven days were 31.36 (SD, 52.19) and 14.7 (IQR, 5.77-32.07) respectively and 242 (51.1%) participants had done sufficient PA. On univariate analysis, being male, good self-rated health, positive intention, self-efficacy, perceived benefits, social support and availability of facilities were associated with sufficient PA. By multivariate analysis sufficient PA was associated with intention for PA (OR 0.75, 95% CIs 0.64, 0.88), and self- efficacy (OR 0.91, 95% CIs 0.85, 0.97) facility availability for PA (OR 0.81 95% CIs 0.73, 0.91).

Conclusion: PA was insufficient among young adults. Positive intention and self-efficacy which were associated with sufficient PA should be supported by availability of facilities and safe built environment for PA. Larger surveys to study about PA and associated social-ecological factors are needed to design rational health promotion strategies.