Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

GROUP SUPPORT LIFESTYLE MODIFICATION (G SLIM) VERSUS DIETARY COUNSELLING FOR OBESE EMPLOYEES IN A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY IN KUALA LUMPUR: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Author

Siti Noraida Jamal 1, 2 , Moy Foong Ming 1 , Mohd Nahar Azmi Mohamed 3 , Zulkarnain Jaafar 3 , Firdaus Mukhtar 4

Institution

1 Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur
2 Ministry of Health, Malaysia
3 Sports Medicine Departments, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya
4 Psychiatry Departments, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Putra University, Malaysia

Abstract

Objectives: This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a group based social support life style modification obesity management program among employees of a public university in Kuala Lumpur.

Methods: This is an open labeled, 1 to 1 randomized controlled trial. The intervention is a six month group support lifestyle modification program modified from the Diabetic Prevention Program. 10 group counseling session is given to the intervention group with topics as per attached schedule (Appendix 1) provided by a multi team comprises of dietitian, medical doctors and psychologist. The control group is given three sessions of individual dietary counseling within the same period provided by dietitian.

Results: Expected outcomes is to evaluate the difference between groups of obesity indicators, clinical outcomes (blood pressure, fasting serum lipids and fasting blood glucose), lifestyle changes (dietary intake and physical activity), psychological effects (weight efficacy, automatic negative thoughts and perceived social support), as well as quality of life.

Conclusion: The G SLiM is designed to provide evidence on group support weight management program for Malaysian adults. Using the underlying theory of health belief model; the social support, self-efficacy, dietary and physical activity behavior change to provide a healthier lifestyle, better clinical outcomes and quality of life of the participants.