Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

VCT UPTAKE AMONG CLIENTS OF NEEDLE SYRINGE EXCHANGE PROGRAM (NSEP) IN KELANTAN AND ITS ASSOCIATED FACTORS

Author

Sahrol Azmi bin Termizi, Wan Mohd Zahiruddin bin Wan Mohammad

Institution

Department of Community Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University Sains Malaysia

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) of HIV among clients of Needle Syringe Exchange Program (NSEP) and the associated factors for VCT uptake.

Methods: This is a cross sectional study using simple random sampling since January 2011 till March 2011. A face to face interview was administered using a validated questionnaire on clients of Needle Syringe Exchange Program in Kota Bharu, Bachok and Pasir Mas who fulfill the study criteria. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analysis were applied using PAWS18.0.

Results: Two hundred and seven NSEP clients responded to the questionnaire. The mean (SD) age was 34.6 (6.7). Most of the clients were males (99.0%) and Malay (97.6%). Three quarter of clients (75.4%) having been either tested for HIV or received counselling or both. Overall 118 (57.0%), 111 (53.6%) and 117 (56.5%) of clients had good knowledge, good attitude and good practice respectively. Factors independently associated with VCT uptake after adjusting for confounders, includes history of receiving medical care, history of admission to rehabilitation centre/prison, clients' attitude level and practice level.

Conclusion: Clients who had history of admission to rehabilitation centre or prison and history of receiving medical care, having good attitude and good practice towards VCT were more likely to accept VCT service. Thus, in scaling up VCT services and other HIV preventions, these determinants should be taken into consideration to ensure successful implementation of the programs. Further studies are needed to assess other important predictors.