Main Organiser

Julius Centre University of Malaya

Co-organiser

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malay

Supported by

University of Malaya

COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE USE AND BELIEFS AMONG YOUNG ADULTS IN MALAYSIA

Author

Fatokun Omotayo

Institution

Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UCSI University, Kuala Lumpur

Abstract

Objectives: There is limited information on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and beliefs among young population group in Malaysia. Therefore, the specific objectives of this study were to examine the use and beliefs regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among young adults in Malaysia.

Methods: Cross-sectional survey of a random sample of university students using a questionnaire adapted from a recently developed CAM Questionnaire for Young Adults.

Results: Total number of respondents were 375 (57.9% female and 42.1% male). Majority of respondents (60%) were aged 18-21 years. Majority of the respondents (79.2%) were CAM users either for preventing, treating or promoting illness. “Parents and family can influence a young adult’s CAM use by exposing them to it” has the highest mean score (M=3.99, SD=0.75) and there is a significant difference between male and female respondents’ scores on the belief that “Young adults are more empowered when using CAM because CAM providers involve them in decisions about their health care treatments” (U=15013, p=0.03).

Conclusion: This present study revealed that majority of young adults in Malaysia are users of CAM and they believe that parental and family influence is an important factor in determining CAM use among young adults in Malaysia.